Employment UK

  • July 12, 2024

    Law Firm Unfairly Fired Solicitor Over Facebook Page

    A law firm unfairly sacked its head of criminal law when it botched a probe into accusations that she was using Facebook to draw clients away from the firm during her resignation period, an employment tribunal has ruled.

  • July 12, 2024

    Met Officer Gets £37K For Disability Discrimination Claim

    A Metropolitan police officer won nearly £37,000 ($48,000) in damages on Friday, with the Employment Tribunal deciding to compensate him for disability discrimination that caused him severe distress and "made his life intolerable."

  • July 12, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen the owner of the Lambretta scooter brand Innocenti SA embroiled in a trademark dispute with a property developer, a clash between two art dealers over a collection of tapestries, Telecom Italia pursue a debt claim against a competing telecommunications company, and performing arts trade union Equity hit a casting directory for charging unfair subscription fees on actors. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • July 12, 2024

    Rise In PTSD Diagnoses Contributing To Workplace Absences

    The National Health Service issued over 1 million sick notes for mental and behavioral disorders last year according to new figures from GQ Littler, underlining the continuing impact of COVID-19 on the workplace.

  • July 12, 2024

    Axiom Owes Ex-Staff £37K In Redundancy, Notice Payments

    A tribunal has ruled that Axiom Ince must pay two more former staff a total of at least £36,700 ($47,500) in redundancy and notice payments, with one of the ex-employees also winning compensation for breaches of trade union rules when the firm collapsed.

  • July 12, 2024

    Gov't Urged To Set Up Comp Program For Pension Failings

    Women who lost out after the government failed to tell them that their retirement age had changed have called for the "swift implementation" of a compensation program by the new pensions minister.

  • July 11, 2024

    Law Firm Must Pay £4K For Racial Abuse Claim Costs

    A defunct London law firm that represented a forklift driver in his "fictional" racial abuse claim against a printing business must pay £4,000 ($5,166) to repay the legal costs the company racked up fighting the claim.

  • July 11, 2024

    Labour Urged To Represent All Generations In Policy Planning

    The new Labour government must ensure that its policy agenda reflects the needs of all generations, pensions provider Aegon said on Thursday, saying its research suggests that under-50s are more positive about their long-term financial planning than those who are older.

  • July 11, 2024

    New Pensions Minister Warned Against 'Hasty Decisions'

    The new pensions minister, Emma Reynolds, should not rush into major policy changes after she inherited a bulging in-tray from her predecessor, a trade body said on Thursday.

  • July 11, 2024

    Gowling Builds £35M Pension Deal For Civil Engineers

    A trade body for engineers has handed £35 million ($45 million) of its pensions liabilities to insurer Aviva PLC, advisers have said, in a buy-in transaction designed to cut risk that was guided by Gowling WLG.

  • July 11, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy CFO Formally Banned After Conviction

    The U.K. audit watchdog said on Thursday that it has formalized its 20-year exclusion from the accountants' professional body of the chief financial officer of software company Autonomy after he was convicted of fraud and securities offenses in the U.S.  

  • July 10, 2024

    FCA Beats Applicant's Claim Over Noise Aversion Condition

    The Financial Conduct Authority did not fail to accommodate a job applicant with a sound sensitivity condition, an employment tribunal has ruled after finding the agency did everything it could to mitigate her condition.

  • July 10, 2024

    Nursery Gets 2nd Shot To Fight Font Size Discrimination Case

    A nursery won a shot on Wednesday at overturning a ruling that it discriminated against a staffer with poor vision by using a standard font size in documents, with an appeals tribunal questioning an earlier decision that the use of the "small" font size was unjustified.

  • July 10, 2024

    Whistleblowing Trainee At Defunct Law Firm Wins £36K

    An employment tribunal has ordered an insolvent law firm to pay more than £36,000 ($46,200) to a trainee it dismissed after she blew the whistle on its "chaotic" operations to the industry regulator.

  • July 10, 2024

    Citi Rebuked Over Botched Misconduct Probe Into Trader

    A decision by Citigroup to fire a trader amid allegations that he had given misleading updates on deals was unfair because its probe was plagued by delays and led to an unreasonable finding of gross misconduct, a tribunal has ruled.

  • July 10, 2024

    Gov't Appoints Minister For Both Treasury And DWP

    The new Labour government has appointed a minister spanning HM Treasury and the Department for Work and Pensions, a move that analysts said could indicate a more joined-up approach to pensions policy.

  • July 09, 2024

    EHRC Floats New Guidance For Sexual Harassment At Work

    The U.K.'s equality watchdog said Tuesday it is seeking feedback on its revised guidance for employers, as a new law giving them a legal duty to prevent sexual harassment comes into place in October.

  • July 09, 2024

    Surgeon's Race Bias Case Must Face New Tribunal

    A London appellate court panel on Tuesday rejected a surgeon's bid to reinstate his race bias claims against the U.K.'s medical regulator following a three-year investigation, asserting that a fresh panel should reconsider the case. 

  • July 09, 2024

    Lawyer Accused Of Making False Mishcon Claims On Iran TV

    The solicitors' watchdog told a disciplinary tribunal on Tuesday that a high-profile criminal defense lawyer recklessly made false statements about Mishcon de Reya LLP while appearing on an antisemitic show on an Iranian state-owned media channel.

  • July 09, 2024

    Chief Constable Loses Sex Bias Case Over Work Vendetta

    A senior police officer in northwest England discriminated against a personal assistant by making her collateral damage in a vendetta he had against a rival female officer, an employment tribunal has ruled.

  • July 09, 2024

    Ex-Axiom Ince Staff Win Claims Over Missing Payments

    A tribunal has ordered Axiom Ince to hand over a total of £11,500 ($14,700) in redundancy and unclaimed holiday payments to three former members of staff after the law firm collapsed in October.

  • July 09, 2024

    Pensions Bill Unlikely In King's Speech, Aegon Says

    Sweeping pension reform is unlikely to be included in the first King's Speech under Keir Starmer's newly elected government, pensions provider Aegon said Tuesday as it predicted that existing changes in retirement savings policy might take center stage.

  • July 09, 2024

    Ex-Pensions Minister Timms Returns To DWP In New Gov't

    Former pensions minister Stephen Timms has returned to the Department for Work and Pensions in the new Labour government, the ministry has said. 

  • July 09, 2024

    BBC Rebuffed In Effort To Cut Costs Of £20B Pension Scheme

    An attempt by the British Broadcasting Corp. to reduce benefits for employees enrolled in its £19.8 billion ($25.4 billion) pension scheme has been rebuffed as the Court of Appeal ruled in favor of members on Tuesday.

  • July 08, 2024

    MoD Accepts 'Duty Of Care' In Hearing Loss Suit

    The Ministry of Defence agreed Monday to uphold its "duty of care" to thousands of active and former service members who are now set to receive compensation for hearing loss from their time in the military.

Expert Analysis

  • What New UK Labour Gov't Is Planning For Financial Services

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    Following the Labour Party’s U.K. election win on July 4, the new government has already announced its key missions for economic growth, green investment and tax reform, so affected Financial Conduct Authority-regulated entities should be prepared for change and on the lookout for details, says Rachael Healey at RPC.

  • What Legal Cannabis In Germany Means For Employers

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    Since April 1, the consumption and limited possession of cannabis has been permitted in Germany, so employers should take a few steps to maintain safe and productive workplaces while respecting the new legal landscape, says Sven Lombard at Simmons & Simmons.

  • How Cos. Can Harness Mobility To Sustain The Space Industry

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    In order to tackle the skills shortage in the U.K. space industry, companies should use immigration policies, which were recently updated by the government, to attract international talent, says Laxmi Limbani at Fragomen.

  • Tips For Orgs Using NDAs In Light Of New UK Legislation

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    The recent passage of the Victims and Prisoners Act follows a crackdown on the misuse of nondisclosure agreements, but although NDAs are not prohibited and regulators recognize their legitimate justification, organizations relying on them must be able to clearly explain that justification if challenged, say attorneys at Macfarlanes.

  • Unpacking The Pay Threshold Hikes For Skilled Worker Visas

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    Many companies were forced to withdraw job offers after the government recently raised the salary thresholds for skilled worker visas, bringing focus to the strain on businesses to quickly adapt to the changing immigration system, say Claire Nilson, Abilio Jaribu and Emily Evans at Faegre Drinker.

  • How Revision Of The EU Works Directive May Affect Cos.

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    The European Union’s proposed revision of the Works Councils Directive, motivated by perceived shortcomings of existing legislation and the transformation of the world of work, includes significant changes that would increase workers' rights, including through strengthened enforcement and confidentiality provisions, says Thomas Player at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • What Employers Should Know About The Tips Act

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    Michael Powner, Isobel Goodman and Hauwa Ottun at Charles Russell examine a recently enacted law that bars employers from making deductions to workers' tips, shed light on the government's final code of practice, and highlight key trends and potential implications

  • Disciplinary Ruling Has Lessons For Lawyers On Social Media

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    A recent Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal judgment against a solicitor for online posts deemed antisemitic and offensive highlights the serious sanctions that can stem from conduct on social media and the importance of law firms' efforts to ensure that their employees behave properly, say Liz Pearson and Andrew Pavlovic at CM Murray.

  • The Art Of Corporate Apologies: Crafting An Effective Strategy

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    Public relations challenges often stop companies from apologizing amid alleged wrongdoing, but a recent U.K. government consultation seeks to make this easier, highlighting the importance of corporate apologies and measures to help companies balance the benefits against the potential legal ramifications, says Dina Hudson at Byfield Consultancy.

  • What UK Supreme Court Strike Ruling Means For Employers

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    Although the U.K. Supreme Court recently declared in Mercer v. Secretary of State that part of a trade union rule and employees' human rights were incompatible, the decision will presumably not affect employer engagement with collective bargaining, as most companies are already unlikely to rely on the rule as part of their broader industrial relations strategy, say lawyers at Baker McKenzie.

  • Accounting For Climate Change In Flexible Working Requests

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    Although the U.K. government's recent updates to the country's flexible working laws failed to include climate change as a factor for evaluating remote work requests, employers are not prohibited from considering the environmental benefits — or drawbacks — of an employee's request to work remotely, say Jonathan Carr and Gemma Taylor at Lewis Silkin.

  • Employer Lessons From Red Bull's Misconduct Investigation

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    Red Bull’s recent handling of a high-profile investigation into team principal Christian Horner’s alleged misconduct toward a colleague serves as a reminder of the importance of thorough internal grievance and disciplinary processes, and offers lessons for employers hoping to minimize media attention, say Charlotte Smith and Adam Melling at Walker Morris.

  • Prepping For A Duty To Prevent Workplace Sexual Harassment

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    With the Worker Protection Act set to roll out this October, employers should anticipate their newly heightened positive obligation to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace and begin updating their policies and addressing potential risk areas now, say Fiona McLellan and Rachael McKenzie at Hill Dickinson.

  • Employment Tribunal Fee Proposal Raises Potential Issues

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    The proposal to reintroduce employment tribunal fees in a recent U.K. government consultation poses serious concerns over the right of access to justice, and will only act as a deterrent for claimants and appellants, says Yulia Fedorenko at CM Murray.

  • Dissecting Recent Developments Against The Misuse Of NDAs

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    The U.K. government's recent plans to nullify nondisclosure agreements that prevent victims from reporting crimes should remind lawyers to proactively consider the necessity of such agreements, especially in light of the Solicitors Regulation Authority's warning notice on drafting improper NDAs, say Clare Davis and Macaela Joyes at RPC.

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